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Alex Roth

'Tis the season... to remove buckthorn?

As we entered the first snowfalls, FMR's contractors were busy with buckthorn removal. Here we explore some of the nuances of removal timing, including a small but important benefit of late-fall and winter removal, whether in your local natural area or your backyard: It's green and easy to see! >>

December 16

Habitat piles: Readers' questions answered

We received a number of emails in response to our earlier update on FMR's wildlife habitat pile event in the river gorge. Most people seem to be excited about the idea that removing invasive species (buckthorn, in this case) could result in additional habitat creation. Others loved the idea and wanted more specific information about how to build those piles. Here we address a few questions and provide some helpful links. >>

November 20

Ecological restoration: A practice in patience

In the world of ecological restoration, changes don't happen overnight. And sometimes, to create a thriving and diverse habitat for wildlife and for water quality, things get a little messier (or even uglier) before they get better. Take the long view with us and check out these before, during and after photos of a few of our restoration projects. >>

August 18

Thanks Akia, our shared summer intern

Akia Vang, our Green Team Alumni summer intern, did a little bit of everything in our office and out in the field, all in two short weeks. (Photo: Tom Reiter and Will Stock for FMR)

Akia Vang, our Green Team Alumni summer intern, woke up early to survey breeding birds and stayed late to assist at volunteer planting events. Akia stayed busy during his two short weeks with us.  >>

July 11

Thanks Akia, our shared summer intern

Akia Vang, our Green Team Alumni summer intern, woke up early to survey breeding birds and stayed late to assist at volunteer planting events. Akia stayed busy during his two short weeks with us.  >>

July 7

New podcast features FMR ecologist and invasive earthworms

Wandering Naturalist

The Wandering Naturalist podcast featured FMR ecologist Alex Roth in May. And in June, the featured topic is water, from water quality to water sports. (Image from Three Rivers Park District.)

Three Rivers Park District's new podcast, The Wandering Naturalist, covers fun Minnesota ecology topics from tracking owls to maple syruping. In this episode, FMR ecologist Alex Roth joined the conversation about the effects of invasive buckthorn and earthworms on Minnesota's wildflowers. >>

June 11

New podcast features FMR ecologist and invasive earthworms

Three Rivers Park District's new podcast, The Wandering Naturalist, covers fun Minnesota ecology topics from tracking owls to maple syruping. In this episode, FMR ecologist Alex Roth joined the conversation about the effects of invasive buckthorn and earthworms on Minnesota's wildflowers. >>

June 7

Calling all cameras: Citizen science for the Twin Cities Coyote and Fox Research Project

Coyote in snow

A coyote hunts mice in a wintry field. The new Twin Cities Coyote and Fox Research Project seeks your canine sightings like this one. (Photo by Karen Schik for FMR.)

Coyotes and foxes are mostly secretive animals, but sightings of these species are becoming more and more common throughout the Twin Cities Metro Area. Now, a group of researchers and partner organizations (including FMR) are setting out to better understand how these critters use the urban environment, and maybe just dispel some myths along the way. You can help!  >>

February 28

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