Conservation and Restoration Blog

FMR works with landowners, government agencies and concerned residents — including hundreds of volunteers — to protect and restore bluffs, prairies, forests and other lands important to our communities and the health of our metro Mississippi.

Here's what our conservation staff are currently working on and encountering in the field.

A map of our protection and restoration sites is available here, as well as more information about our approach and program.

Conservation updates are also shared on social media (Facebook and Twitter) and in our Mississippi Messages newsletter.

sue rich
December 5, 2019

FMR ecologist and frequent conservation blog contributor Alex Roth was recently featured by KARE11 in a piece on our metro fox and coyote populations.

Although triggered by a coyote attack on an Inver Grove Heights family's beloved dog, Moose, the story referenced the Twin Cities Fox and Coyote Research Project. FMR is a proud partner for the LCCMR-funded project — and we are so glad that Moose is expected to make a full recovery! Watch the video >>

Alex Roth
November 20, 2019

We received a number of emails in response to our earlier update on FMR's wildlife habitat pile event in the river gorge. Most people seem to be excited about the idea that removing invasive species (buckthorn, in this case) could result in additional habitat creation. Others loved the idea and wanted more specific information about how to build those piles. Here we address a few questions and provide some helpful links. >>

Karen Schik
November 5, 2019

Where can you walk through a dry waterfall, find karst topography, encounter a walking fern, meet ancient bur oak trees and see the oldest operating flour mill in the state? Vermillion Falls Park in Hastings! Oh, and there's a large rushing waterfall here as well. >>

Ellen Rogers
November 2, 2019

FMR ecologist Alex Roth's earthworm research made it on the cover of the highly regarded professional journal Science at the end of October, the same journal that published the human genome for the first time.  >>

Sophie Downey
October 31, 2019

Facing a steep climb up tall stairs, FMR staff and River Gorge Stewards opted for a creative way to dispose of invasive buckthorn at a recent volunteer event along the river: create habitat piles. >> 

Karen Schik
October 29, 2019

If you live in the Twin Cities Metro area and have seen gray fox, red fox or coyotes or their tracks, we could use your help!  >>

October 24, 2019

This summer we found the Minnesota state bee at one of our restoration sites. Why is that newsworthy?  >>

Betsy Daub
October 10, 2019

Daurius Mikroberts, one of FMR's 2019 summer ecology interns, reflects on a summer monitoring birds, pollinators, turtles and native plants at FMR restoration sites. Despite the mosquitoes, Daurius says the internship was "one of the best ways I’ve ever spent a summer."  >>

Irene Jones
October 9, 2019

What's next for this special place (and FMR restoration site) on our great river? You can help decide. >>

sue rich
October 8, 2019

We didn't pay MPR to write that headline, but it's exactly the message we want people to understand. >>

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