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KARE11 covers coyote research after attack

FMR ecologist and frequent conservation blog contributor Alex Roth was recently featured by KARE11 in a piece on our metro fox and coyote populations.

Although triggered by a coyote attack on an Inver Grove Heights family's beloved dog, Moose, the story referenced the Twin Cities Fox and Coyote Research Project. FMR is a proud partner for the LCCMR-funded project — and we are so glad that Moose is expected to make a full recovery! Watch the video >>

December 5

Check out our conservation blog!

Endangered speces at FMR sites

A trio of endangered species found at FMR conservation and restoration sites. Left to right: Loggerhead shrike, Blanchard's cricket frog and Henslow's sparrow. (Photos by Terry Ross, Greg Schecter and Jim Hudgins/USFWS.)

Endangered species, fishers, fields of monarchs — FMR ecologists encounter them all at our 37 habitat restoration sites.  

On our new conservation blog, learn more about what our ecologists see in the field, the special places we're working to protect and how we restore habitat. >>

September 9

Meet the loggerhead shrike, the rare butcher bird of FMR-restored prairies

Don't be fooled. Known for its striking gray-blue and white coloring and stunning, sweet song, this small songbird is also a fearsome killer.

The loggerhead shrike spikes small lizards on thorns and stakes mice on barbed wire. It's a rare prairie predator — now endangered in Minnesota — and a positive sign for habitat. That's why we're delighted to have loggerhead shrikes at two FMR-protected and restored sites. >>

August 29

River access, wildlife habitat, year-round recreation: Cottage Grove’s unique opportunity

People enjoying park

A Mississippi Dunes park in Cottage Grove could create access to the river throughout the seasons. (Illustration by Kimberly Boustead and Emily Sauer)

The City of Cottage Grove has the opportunity to turn an old golf course into open space for wildlife and a recreational park for residents and visitors in an area lacking in river access. Here are our top reasons why we should protect this special place from development.  >>

May 25

Meet our elusive, big brown trout

The Twin Cities is home to a rare trophy trout stream known for these not-so-brown trout. (Photo by Latham Jenkins, Circumerro Stock.) 

In a cold prairie river just 20 or so minutes south of St. Paul, large brown trout gather in the shadow of red-twig dogwoods, willows and other stream-side plants. Learn more about these wily and beautiful reminders of the importance of protecting our local waters, and how you can help protect them. (Hint: Volunteer at our Vermillion watershed events on 5/23 and 6/22!) >>

May 15

Minnesota’s coveted native orchids

Though we certainly don’t live in a tropical climate, our state is home to almost 50 native orchids. If you need a reprieve from the muted winter palette, check out our vivid photos of blooming orchids and learn more about some of Minnesota's loveliest plants.  >>

March 6

Ecological research and monitoring at FMR

SPA monitoring

St. Paul Academy students sample for earthworms, an invasive species in Minnesota, at Crosby Farm Park in St. Paul. Our work there helps us understand the impacts earthworms have on native plant diversity, so we can refine and prioritize our habitat restoration efforts.

FMR has worked to restore over two thousand acres in the Mississippi River's metro watershed. Our hope is that diverse natural communities of plants and wildlife will return and thrive. And so far, our surveys and studies point to a positive connection between our habitat restoration work and the plants and animals our work is meant to support.  >>

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