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Autumn bluff and blue river

Pine Bend Bluffs SNA in Inver Grove Heights was our first major conservation project in the 1990s. The story of our work there highlights some of the strategies we still use to guide our protection and restoration efforts today.

Our Land Conservation program has protected and restored more than three dozen sites near the metro Mississippi River. Here's how we decide where to focus our efforts.  >>

Star Tribune: 'Habitat or housing?' ... We say both

Ramsey County is grappling with a big question: Is responding to both our climate crisis and affordable housing crisis a zero-sum game? How can we create the housing the Twin Cities needs, while also preserving the homes of other species whose populations are collapsing?  >>

July 19

Ramsey County considers three properties for redevelopment, conservation

The county is making plans for three properties on the east side of St. Paul: The site of a former juvenile correctional facility on undeveloped bluffland holding Dakota history; a golf course that's home to an endangered bumblebee; and a grassland where prairie birds flock. We've encouraged officials to inventory ecological resources and work with those studying the cultural resources before proceeding with planning.  >>

New river access in Cottage Grove?

The former Mississippi Dunes golf course in Cottage Grove has amazing potential to be a new park, but its owners want to develop it into housing. You can weigh in to protect habitat and public river access at this special site.  >>

A new federal initiative to restore America's River?

Egret flying over river

The Everglades, Chesapeake Bay, the Great Lakes, the Mighty Mississippi — Which national treasure doesn't yet have a federal initiative to protect and restore it? If you guessed the Mississippi, you’re right. But a new effort has emerged to change that. (Photo by Tom Reiter)

The Everglades, Chesapeake Bay, the Great Lakes, the Mighty Mississippi — guess which national treasure does not have a federal initiative to protect and restore it? If you guessed the Mississippi, you’re correct. But a new effort has emerged to change that. >>

December 14

Dakota County ponders pathways for conservation

Last spring, Dakota County put together an exciting plan to conserve up to 40,000 acres important to our communities, wildlife and waters. Dozens of you voiced support for the plan to the county commissioners who are now considering whether and how to fund the effort. Sign up to stay in the loop.  >>

July 14

Say 'Yes!' to fund Dakota County parks and natural areas

In the mood for a little good news? There's some impressive conservation planning happening on behalf of natural resources and open spaces in Dakota County. And with some urging from community members, the county-drawn plans could lead to some exciting land protection and habitat restoration projects — thousands of acres worth! 

A previous similar effort protected many beloved Dakota County parks and natural areas, including creating habitat for animals like the fisher above. >>

June 24

Say 'Yes!' to Dakota County parks and natural areas

If you live in Dakota County or use and value its parks, you now have the opportunity (through July 3) to advocate for protecting and restoring additional parks, natural areas and greenways. Learn about and give the county a thumbs-up for their draft conservation plan.   >>

June 12

Become a community scientist

Scientists sometimes turn to the public to collect observations and data on flora and fauna. If you’re heading outside, why not take note of the wildlife and blooms you see? Here are a few of our favorite projects that call for community scientists.  >>

April 28

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