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restoration

Counting critters at Pine Bend Bluffs, our longest-running restoration

Over the last 20 years at Pine Bend Bluffs, we've converted a buckthorn forest to oak savanna and a Siberian elm canopy to prairie. Now we're monitoring the site to see how wildlife is responding. Since we restore lands largely to benefit animals (and plants), documenting critters is a valuable measure of success. And survey says: We've been pretty successful.  >>

March 9

Spotting rare, native ladybugs

Lady beetles (also called ladybugs) are one of the most common insects we encounter in summer. They may be the first insects toddlers can identify, easily recognizable because of their bright red color and contrasting black spots. But almost all of the ladybugs you're likely to see aren't native. What happened to our 50 native species?  >>

February 10

Habitat piles: Readers' questions answered

We received a number of emails in response to our earlier update on FMR's wildlife habitat pile event in the river gorge. Most people seem to be excited about the idea that removing invasive species (buckthorn, in this case) could result in additional habitat creation. Others loved the idea and wanted more specific information about how to build those piles. Here we address a few questions and provide some helpful links. >>

November 20

Vermillion Falls Park: take a walk with walking fern

Where can you walk through a dry waterfall, find karst topography, encounter a walking fern, meet ancient bur oak trees and see the oldest operating flour mill in the state? Vermillion Falls Park in Hastings! Oh, and there's a large rushing waterfall here as well. >>

November 5

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