Working to protect the Mississippi River and its watershed in the Twin Cities area

Phenology

Irruption disruption

A mega-irruption of snowy owls spreads across the continent, with reports as far as Bermuda. Read more…

December ice

Ice is forming on lakes and streams. Read more…

They only make it this far south?

When we think about bird migration, we mostly do so within the context of our summer birds hightailing it out of here for points south. Yet, there are migrants that, while flying south in the fall, land here to spend the winter. Read more…

Cold-blooded conundrum

It’s time for wild animals to start hunkering down for the winter in the Midwest. What are cold-blooded animals doing to prepare for winter? Read about some over-wintering adaptations and strategies of frogs, salamanders, turtles, snakes, lizards, and invertebrates. Read more…

Springy Fall

Day length is now mimicking that of spring causing unseasonable hormonal havoc in animals and plants. Read more…

A plethora of pollinators

Now is a great time to see pollinators. Bumblebees, honeybees, wasps, monarchs, swallowtail butterflies, clear-wing moths, beetles, hummingbirds and more are out there right now foraging for pollen and nectar. Although a crucially important part of our ecosystem, pollinators are in worldwide decline. You can help by preserving natural lands and by planting a diversity of native flowering plants on your land. Read more…

Oak Savanna Interpretive Tour [FULL]

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Enjoy an ecologist-guided tour of a beloved River Gorge Stewards site, the blufftop oak savanna in south Minneapolis.

Berry cool

Mid- to late-summer is the time when the fruit of our native shrubs and trees become ripe, providing important nutrition for many animal species. Read more…

The twinkling lights of summer

Ah the firefly. Who doesn’t marvel at the flickering glow of these amazing animals. But there is a dark side to some firefly species. Find out who does what to whom and why! Read more…

Ferns, Fern Allies, and Horsetails

Along with the perhaps showier forbs (wildflowers), spring is also a good time to observe ferns and fern allies, which are finally emerging from this year’s particularly long winter dormancy. If you are hunting for fiddle-heads, now is a good time to do it! Bracken and ostrich ferns are now uncurling their little heads, forming new fronds. Read more…