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Land Conservation

Say 'Yes!' to Dakota County parks and natural areas

If you live in Dakota County or use and value its parks, you now have the opportunity (through July 3) to advocate for protecting and restoring additional parks, natural areas and greenways. Learn about and give the county a thumbs-up for their draft conservation plan.   >>

June 12

Growing diversity for climate resiliency in Minneapolis riverfront forests

In a gravel-bed nursery that captures stormwater at the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization’s office, we’re growing tree species predicted to do well as Minnesota's climate warms. These bare-root trees will be ready to plant at our habitat restoration sites this fall, where they’ll strengthen the resiliency of our riverfront canopy.  >>

May 13

Become a community scientist

Scientists sometimes turn to the public to collect observations and data on flora and fauna. If you’re heading outside, why not take note of the wildlife and blooms you see? Here are a few of our favorite projects that call for community scientists.  >>

April 28

FMR members make a difference for Twin Cities Coyote and Fox Project

Hundreds of you responded to our call to support a U of M study to better understand canid species and how they use the urban metro. Now that the first field season is complete, we chatted with Nick McCann of the Twin Cities Coyote and Fox Project to hear about how the year went and how FMR members played an important role in its success.  >>

April 7

Counting critters at Pine Bend Bluffs, our longest-running restoration

Over the last 20 years at Pine Bend Bluffs, we've converted a buckthorn forest to oak savanna and a Siberian elm canopy to prairie. Now we're monitoring the site to see how wildlife is responding. Since we restore lands largely to benefit animals (and plants), documenting critters is a valuable measure of success. And survey says: We've been pretty successful.  >>

March 9

Spotting rare, native ladybugs

Lady beetles (also called ladybugs) are one of the most common insects we encounter in summer. They may be the first insects toddlers can identify, easily recognizable because of their bright red color and contrasting black spots. But almost all of the ladybugs you're likely to see aren't native. What happened to our 50 native species?  >>

February 10

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