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Land Conservation

Vermillion Falls Park

Vermillion Falls Park

At the stunning waterfall after which this park is named, the Vermillion River drops 35 feet, then runs through limestone gorge and forest. We've been managing habitat restoration here since 2019. (Photo by Tom Reiter)

At the stunning waterfall after which this park is named, the Vermillion River drops 35 feet, then runs through limestone gorge and forest. We've been managing habitat restoration here since 2019. Find out what's special about this place.  >>

Why insects matter and what you can do about their decline

In the past few years, news of the decline of insect populations has raised alarm bells. Experts say the world is losing around 1 to 2 percent of its insects each year. By now, most people know pollinators are vital to making about a third of our food supply. But what about all the other insects — does this overall population decrease matter?  >>

January 29

A new federal initiative to restore America's River?

Egret flying over river

The Everglades, Chesapeake Bay, the Great Lakes, the Mighty Mississippi — Which national treasure doesn't yet have a federal initiative to protect and restore it? If you guessed the Mississippi, you’re right. But a new effort has emerged to change that. (Photo by Tom Reiter)

The Everglades, Chesapeake Bay, the Great Lakes, the Mighty Mississippi — guess which national treasure does not have a federal initiative to protect and restore it? If you guessed the Mississippi, you’re correct. But a new effort has emerged to change that. >>

December 14

Hundreds of birds in the one and only river gorge

For 33 years, Dave Zumeta has kept meticulous lists of the birds he's seen in the Mississippi River Gorge, a band of habitat FMR works to restore that is critical for migrators on the flyway. These lists have become a valuable tool to help us track the health of our river habitat. Learn more about Dave's surprising findings, troubling and encouraging trends.  >>

October 16

Public comment sought for new Pig's Eye islands

The Star Tribune recently covered the island-building project at Pig's Eye Lake in East Side St. Paul's riverfront park. As our executive director Whitney Clark stated in the article, FMR supports the project overall, and would also like to see project planners "really consider including climate-adaptive species and use this opportunity to understand more about habitat restoration in the era of climate change."  >>

September 4

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