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FMR Updates

FMR River Guardians rock their first official year!

River Guardians speak up for the river.

We're incredibly grateful and delighted to report that our community of river advocates more than doubled in 2017!

River Guardians helped to save River Heights Park in Inver Grove Heights, rein in water quality rollbacks at the Capitol, worked for improved public access to the riverfront in North and Northeast Minneapolis and much more. Check out the 2017 best-of photos! >>

December 15

Minnesota Governor Candidate Forum

Meet the candidates who want to be your Governor and let them know you care about the water we drink, the air we breathe, the land we live on and enjoy, and the legacy we leave behind.

This event is free but capacity is limited and early registration is highly recommended. >>

It’s time to put our waters on a low-salt diet

Road salt truck

We use salt to manage snow and ice in Minnesota, but too much can irreparably harm our lakes and streams. It's time for Minnesota to go on a low-salt diet. (Photo Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.)

Just 1 teaspoon of salt is enough to permanently pollute 5 gallons of water. Chloride pollution to Minnesota’s waters has made headlines recently, and it's time for new strategies to protect our water. Learn how you can help, both long-term and this winter as you shovel (or sweep!) your walk. >>

December 7

Help us identify the river views we need to protect

Upper Mississippi River from Pine Bend SNA

Now through spring 2018, the 25 metro-area cities and towns in our local national park, the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, are working to identify scenic river views worth protecting. Once each city has determined its list, they must work to protect these views according to new state rules that protect the metro river corridor. Let's help our cities compile the best list possible!

Check out the views submitted so far, and then tell us about yours or help by contributing a needed photo. >>

December 7

Shovels in the ground for three new river destinations

Illustration of Halls Island to-be

Illustration of Halls Island to-be

Three new destinations are beginning to take shape along the river north of St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis, each with something different to offer. Coming up: a reclaimed island (image above), a destination riverfront restaurant, and one fully featured playground.  >>

November 16

A shocking, long-awaited outing — The 2017 volunteer trout survey

“It’s been three years of cancellations with high water in the river and getting rained out," said volunteer Tom Ziegler with a smile. "They [FMR] dangle this carrot when we do the buckthorn removal across the road, that if we did that job, we would get to do this event.”

Well, 2017 was finally the year. >>

November 14

State studies confirm: 40 percent of MN lakes and rivers are polluted

Lake Pepin along the Mississippi River, impaired for excess nutrients

The Lake Pepin-Mississippi watershed is among many that feel to meet water quality standards. (Photo courtesy of the MPCA)

In the land of 10,000 lakes, about 40 percent of Minnesota’s waters fail to meet basic health standards according to a pair of new state water quality reports — with our namesake river, the Minnesota, among the most polluted. >>

November 13

Nature Notes: Let's talk turkeys

A wild turkey displaying its feathers

A wild turkey struts his stuff.

Once on the brink of extinction in Minnesota and beyond, wild turkeys are now a common sight for Twin Cities and greater Minnesota residents alike. This November, take a minute to learn about this wild animal with an interesting history. >>

November 13

A big new prairie is on the way!

The farm field at the William H Houlton Conservation Area about to be turned into prairie

An aerial view of a prairie in progress. On the left: stubble left over from the fall soybean harvest. On the right: the half of the field worked up for broadcast seeding native prairie species.

It's not every day that FMR ecologists get to convert 180 acres of soybean and farm fields back to native prairie. Sure, we return park lawns and buckthorn thickets to prairie every year, but individual project sites rarely crack the 100-acre mark.

So we're especially excited about beginning the large-scale transformation at the William H. Houlton Conservation Area in Elk River. Check out some photos from the first steps of creating this much-needed pollinator and wildlife habitat at the confluence of the Elk and Mississippi rivers! 

November 13

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